I’m not going to waste time with an introductory paragraph. Anything I would have said here would have told you absolutely nothing about what this album sounds like. It was produced by John Naclerio—Smartpunk says so, and that’s pretty neat—but we already know that just because someone shares a producer with, say, My Chemical Romance, it doesn’t mean they’re going to sound the same. (Thank God.) And unless you’re an indie music god or something, you probably didn’t know who John Naclerio was before this. So this review is for you non-music gods, indie or otherwise… There is some really wonderful music on this CD, and I’m here to tell you just how wonderful it is.
        …Dammit, I just wasted time with an introductory paragraph, didn’t I.
        “Begin” starts it all off exactly how an introductory semi-instrumental track should. It gives each instrument—vocals included, and how hard is it not to love that fantastic harmony between James and Erin?—a chance to show off. Oh-so-tentatively passionate and cautiously aggressive, it grows in power as it reaches the end, leading nicely into the rest of the album.
        With the rhythmic crashing at the beginning of “Let’s Make My First Accident My Last,” you’d half-expect Geoff Rickley to come screaming, “The stage is set… for a surprise Thursday album!” But no, the intro leads into a song all The Morning Of’s own… after you get past the curiously Thursdayish few lines of vocal intro too, that is. Then it’s that delectable vocal harmony again, so infectious it should probably be quarantined. But don’t let me ignore the other instruments. Carefully mellow at first, this song follows the intro’s pattern by escalating into rockability around halfway through. You can really hear how perfectly all the instruments are coordinated for the hardest impact possible.
        “A Barrel Tapped at Both Ends” is poppier than its fellow tracks. It’s clear that dancing was the theme in mind when this song was being written. The combination of elegant piano with frantic acoustic and bold electric guitar is just one more facet of the diversity within each track on this CD. Uber-melodic vocals that contrast over octaves and style, several types of instruments contributing simultaneously and merging seamlessly… If you can’t hear what I’m talking about, I suggest you have your ears examined.
        The good gentlemen of Fear Before the March of Flames seem to have had at least a slice of influence upon the creation of “There’s a Bully in the Park and a Hero in my Baseball Bat.” And no, I’m not complaining. I, for one, adore my Fear Before. Plus, the fact that, after the intro, the song is supported by some kickass piano and more of Erin’s lovely soprano—Fear Before the March of Flames and Straylight Run… they’d have beautiful children—shows how this band can burst into the most unexpected combinations of the genre stereotypes in today’s scene.
        I’m not going to get into the last two tracks on this CD… you get the idea. Anger and aggression channeled into beautiful melodies led by piano and a combination of drastically different vocal styles… Meaningful, heartfelt lyrics and meanings directly reflected in the passion each member contributes to every track… I think you’ll just have to listen to see what I mean. Expect the unexpected from The Morning Of.
...
A.A. '05
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1) Begin
2) Let's Make My First Accident My Last
<< 3) A Barrel Tapped at Both Ends >>
4) There's a Bully in the Park and a Hero in My Baseball Bat
5) A Beautiful Place, Not A Beautiful Face
6) The Dreamer and the Realist
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